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10) Quinn Buckner

Definitely, Buckner was not an explosive scorer to say the least, but he was a great court general and defensively he was a force to be reckoned with.

9) Glenn Robinson

Some will argue that being the first player picked in the draft makes Robinson’s career a bust. That may be true but not many could have lived up to the expectations that the NBA had for Robinson’s career. He was still while he was a member of the Bucks the best player on the team.

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8) Ray Allen

Allen is the unquestioned best pure shooter in Bucks history. He holds franchise records for career three-point field goals made (1051) and for most threes made in a single season (229).

7) Bob Lanier

Lanier’s prime years were in Detroit, but he was nothing to sneeze at when he got to Milwaukee averaging over 13 points per game and giving the Bucks a much-needed inside presence when he arrived in the 1979-80 season. Injuries really hurt his time in Milwaukee but he was a great addition to the team and community.

6) Terry Cummings

Cummings was the Rookie of the year with the Clippers and shortly after he was traded to the Bucks. Cummings joined the Bucks before the 1984 season and the rest was history as he was part of one of the greatest runs in Bucks history ending at the end of the 1989 season. If not for injuries he may have ended up higher on this list.

5)Marques Johnson

Johnson for some reason is forgotten by a lot of people outside of Milwaukee but he teamed up in the early 80s with Moncrief to form one of the best backcourts in the NBA. Johnson helped lead the Bucks to 5 straight playoff appearances and a few deep runs, including a 1983 sweep of the favored Boston Celtics, and gave the great 76ers team of 1983 their only playoff loss.

4) Bobby Dandridge

Dandridge was the third-best player on the 1971 NBA Championship team, but there is nothing wrong with being third fiddle to Jabbar and Robertson. During the Bucks’ championship season, Dandridge averaged 18.4 points, 8.0 rebounds, and 3.5 assists while converting 50.9 percent of his field-goal attempts.

3) Oscar Robertson

Robertson’s prime was in Cincinnati with the Royals, but in Milwaukee, he formed a lethal 1-2 combination with Kareem Abdul Jabbar and was a driving force in the Franchises only World Championship.

2) Sidney Moncrief

Longevity as Buck separates him from the Big O. During a stretch of 1982-86, Moncrief averaged 21.0 points, 5.8 rebounds, 4.7 assists, and 1.5 steals while shooting 50.3 percent from the field. He was the leader of the team and a great defender. Injuries hurt his career after 1986 but he was one of the top guards of the decade of the 80s. NBA’s Defensive Player of the Year in 1983 and 1984. He led the Bucks to 3 Eastern Conference finals apperances.

1). Kareem Abdul Jabbar

No doubt this was going to be number one was there? Of course, he is remembered by most for his time with the Los Angeles Lakers but he was even better as a Milwaukee Buck where he averaged 30.4 points and 15.3 rebounds per game, Kareem was an absolute force. At 7’2″ with lethal footwork, a soft touch, and his trademark sky hook, which was the most unstoppable shot in NBA history, he was a nightmare for defenders.

He also led the franchise to its only championship in 1971, solidifying his status as the greatest player in the history of the Milwaukee Bucks.