Randy enjoyed a long career playing 16 seasons of professional football in the NFL and CFL. He was definitely a late bloomer, having only started playing football at the age of 18. Having some success he continued his play as he went to CEGEP which is schooling after high school in the province of Quebec. From there he chose to attend McGill University which is the Stanford or Harvard of Canada. Not known for producing pro football players, he set out to be a trail blazer. When he arrived, he set a goal to be invited to the East-West Shrine game which is an All-Star game for the best college seniors. It was a lofty goal, especially with his football experience and his school. However he achieved his goal by becoming one of the best defensive lineman in Canada. He also learned to snap, which he thought would be a good skill to have to make it to the next level. Football wasn’t the only thing on his mind while in school. He made sure to get a teaching degree which he knew would be something he could use if he didn’t make it to the pros, or after his career was over. The long snapping he learned came in handy at the East-West Shrine game where he garnered the attention of scouts and coaches with his snapping abilities. That led to him being drafted in the NFL Draft by the Jacksonville Jaguars.

He went through training camp but was released at the end of pre-season. However, in the last pre-season game verses the Dallas Cowboys he performed well enough to make an impression on them. After being released by the Jaguars, he was signed by the Cowboys. Minutes after winning a locker-room snapping competition, he was rushed of to be introduced as a member of the team! After his stint with the Cowboys he returned to Canada to play with the Edmonton Eskimos, who drafted him in the Canadian Football League draft. He won a Grey Cup with them as well as with the Calgary Stampeders, whom he would play with after. He went to Calgary in part due to their coach, Tom Higgins, who coached him in Edmonton. In 2008, they made another coaching change and brought in John Hufnagel. The new regime didn’t value his defensive skills as much so he became primarily a long snapper. It was a tough pill to take, but he maintained a positive attitude and excelled at what he was asked to do. His 2014 season was memorable for a few reasons. That year he was awarded the Tom Pate Award, for his contributions to the community. He also, along with the team, won the Grey Cup that year. Even though he didn’t play in the game, he still felt apart of the team and felt he contributed to the victory.

The following season he regained his starting position as the long snapper. After a final season with the Saskatchewan Roughriders he went into the Fire Department. Everyone he asked about being a Fire Fighter always had something good to say about it. That prompted him to pursue a career as a fireman. He loves his job and the team aspect of it that is similar to his football team comradery. He continues to teach as well part-time along with speaking engagements for anti-bullying initiatives. For more information on Randy and to follow what he’s doing please go to the links below.

Listen to “After the Gridiron: Interview With Retired NFL and CFL Player Randy Chevrier” on Spreaker.

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