In a display worthy of the grandiose occasion, Tyson Fury, (30-0-1, 21 KOs), expanded his kingly domain, holding sway not only over the Irish, but the whole British Isles and beyond. He is now the World’s Champion, the man atop the heavyweight heap–an inheritor of an ancient yet lofty sports prize.

Fury’s 273-pound frame was a concern for many but proved an asset in dismantling an Adonis-looking Deontay Wilder, (42-1-1, 41 KOs), who scaled the largest of his career at 231. The Brit made little effort to cloak his intentions and pressed behind educated feints and jabs early, the latter of which he threw one less overall (110 for Wilder; 109 for Fury) but landed close to twice as many (52 to 28) and with greater accuracy (48% to 25%).

Once inside, Tyson smothered, banged, and bullied Wilder, dropping him twice in the process–once from a right hand to the head and the other from a left hook to the body. From round three on he came out ahead in every single statistical category measured by BoxStat. Once the rout had completed in the seventh, Fury had out-thrown Wilder by more than 86 punches (272 to 186), landed 81 more (135 to 54), dominated the combination category (52 total for Fury; 33 for Wilder), and done so at a clip of 50%.

The question now is will Wilder invoke a contractual stipulation which gives him immediate access to a trilogy. Many fans have stated that there is no need after such a conclusive result (arguably two), yet some on Wilder’s team have already expressed the desire to give the green light. The monetary potential will be tough to say no to.

On the other side, Fury may have to honor a third fight but in the meantime he has become a star. His personality has a gravitational pull we haven’t seen in many years. He’s a one-man P.R. firm, backed by big bucks to help him along the way. This means every fight is an attraction and the men over at Matchroom are salivating over a prospective showdown with Anthony Joshua.