All good things come to an end and no one lasts forever. It seems as though the “Triple-G” era is over. He’s done as a dominant force. It will always frustrate the fan in me to look back at his career, the way he was swerved shamelessly by everyone until he was just enough past it to be manageable. Even with that, a solid argument can be made that he has still never lost a fight.

Certainly most people had him beating Canelo the first time, and I and many others scored the second fight for him as well, albeit closer. It grates me that fans and boxing historians didn’t get to see an all-time great title run from an all-time great middleweight. In my opinion, Golovkin was the best middleweight since Marvin Hagler. He was being ducked for a title shot as far back as 2009. Imagine if he had won his title when he should have, how many defenses he would have had. Probably, we would have seen him face Sergio Martinez, and he would have gotten the big fights (Canelo) a few years before he did, when was still in his prime, instead of when he was declining.

Now, essentially, he’s done. An all-time great fighter, robbed of the opportunity to ever fully prove it. Boxing fans robbed of an opportunity to see him fully prove it. His biggest moments all came at an advanced age. Struggles with Jacobs, Canelo and Derevyanchenko that wouldn’t have been close 2 or 3 years before that. After the fight, Loeffler and Golovkins handlers seemed to know this, their facial expressions said it all. On the other hand, the shell of Triple G (at least that is who I saw fight) was enough to barely beat an excellent Sergiy Derevyanchenko.

Some fighters, their decline is erratic. They slip, then a little more, but, here and there they surprise us with the occasional vintage performance. With GGG, his decline seems steady and linear. He’s a little less with each fight. And, if the pattern holds, he’ll be a little less effective next year. He still has power, but he no longer delivers it to the correct spot at the right time. His endurance has looked very suspect in both of last two fights. Against Derevyanchenko, even his “best in sport” jab had dropped a level in effectiveness.

At this point, I not only do not see him having a shot to win a third fight with Alvarez, if he gets one, I don’t think he beats Demetrius Andrade either. It’s likely Golovkin doesn’t get by Derevyanchenko in a rematch, if that is what’s up next for him. A move to 168 would be a fool’s errand. There are some good young fighters up there who would also be larger than him. It’s sad, but Gennady Golovkin is a few ticks of the clock away from being a stepping-stone. A gate-keeper. Personally, I have no interest in seeing that.

Nothing, no one, lasts forever and all good things come to an end.