Kyle Guy the senior Cavaliers guard told reporters that he and fiancee Alex Jenkins were told to make their wedding registry private to avoid potential NCAA rules violations.

“Yeah, that was crazy to me that that’s illegal because that’s what a registry is for,” Guy told reporters. “NCAA said it was illegal, so I’m not going to argue with it right now. I’m going to try and win a national championship and then we’ll open that book.”

NCAA rules clamp down on gifts to student-athletes, including cash benefits from outside parties and players on scholarship aren’t allowed to accept gifts that exceed the cost of their food and lodging. Any well-meaning (or not-so-well-meaning) fan helping out Guy and his bride-to-be ahead of their July 18 wedding could trigger a violation, something top-seeded Virginia probably isn’t looking for with a March Madness title potentially looming.

There’s just one problem, though: The NCAA says Guy has it wrong.

“Nobody in the NCAA said anything of the sort,” NCAA President Mark Emmert said. “We don’t know what the source of that information was… It’s certainly not the case that it’s a violation of NCAA rules.”

Why would Guy lie? He probably isn’t. Why would Emmert lie? Well that’s easy, he is President of the NCAA, one of the most corrupt organizations in the United States (that is saying a lot)! With all of this being said I figured why not dig into some NCAA rules and what some athletes have gotten in trouble for, so here you go!

Oklahoma’s Pasta Gate

In 2013, the University of Oklahoma self-reported a long list of secondary violations committed by the athletic department over an 18-month span. Included in this was a shocking confession: Three players ate more pasta than they were allowed. No really, this actually happened–overeating too much pasta! Let’s dig into what actually happened.

Violation: Three current student-athletes received food in excess of NCAA regulation at a graduation banquet. The three had graduated from the school but returned for an additional season of competition. The players were provided pasta in excess of the permissible amount allowed. Resolution: The three were required to donate $3.83 each (the cost of the pasta serving) to a charity of their choice in order to be reinstated. The department provided rules education to applicable athletics department staff members.

Now the NCAA claimed they didn’t have the rule and Oklahoma punished themselves. Now this is where it gets tricky and by tricky I mean the NCAA said it wasn’t a rule, so I decided to check out the NCAA rulebook and here is what I found.

16.11.1.10 Incidental Benefits—Reasonable Refreshments. An institution may provide student-athletes with reasonable refreshments (e.g., soft drinks, snacks) for student-athlete educational and business meetings and, on an occasional basis, for celebratory events (e.g., birthdays). [R] (Adopted: 10/28/99)

So it seems reasonable that Oklahoma broke the rule!

Sooner Butt-Dial Gate

Heinous crimes seem to run rampant at Oklahoma (just kidding Sooner fans). Oklahoma reported an assistant coach’s accidental butt-dial of a recruit that resulted in the player being declared ineligible pending further review. Here is the rule and what happened.

Violation: Assistant coach Bruce Kittle pocket-dialed a recruit a day after receiving a permissible text message from the recruit. Resolution: Football staff was prohibited from initiating phone calls or correspondence with the recruit involved for four weeks and the recruit was declared ineligible for competition at the school barring NCAA reinstatement.

Geno Auriemma’s Illegal Phone Call to Congratulate Little League Pitcher Mo’ne Davis

Do you remember Davis the 12-year-old female pitcher in the little league World Series? Mo’ne Davis was the feel-good sports story of the summer of 2014, but when UConn women’s basketball coach Geno Auriemma called the 13-year-old little leaguer and fellow Philadelphian to pass along his congratulations, the NCAA slapped him with a secondary recruiting violation. The bylaws state coaches aren’t allowed to call prospects until their junior year of high school—not even to say a quick, “Way to go.” Sure It was probably cool for Davis to get a call from the legendary coach but hey, Geno needs pitchers!

Illegal Dunks by North Florida Basketball Players

An NCAA rule states that players are not allowed to dunk in the last twenty minutes of pregame warmups before a game starts. The rule is real Section 4, Class B, Article 1e—in the NCAA Men’s Basketball rulebook. In 2014 North Florida broke the rule, resulting in Tennessee Tech shooting two technical free throws to start the game and in the end, North Florida lost by two points.

Perry Jones’ Mother’s Loan

This is one of the most hideous by the NCAA. While finishing out his senior year of high school, Jones was essentially homeless. The bank had foreclosed on his family’s home because the family, struggling under the weight of his mother’s medical bills as she battled a severe heart condition, couldn’t make the mortgage payments. The Joneses were able to rent cheap hotel rooms by the week for a while, and then the money ran out. When the money ran out Ms. Jones reached out to Perry’s former AAU coach to ask for a loan of three monthly payments of $1,195 to put towards the families mortgage to keep them off the streets. Ms. Jones actually paid the entire loan back by the 15th of the same month. The NCAA suspended Perry Jones for six games because of this.

Conclusion: The NCAA are nothing more than slave masters who make a huge profit off of student athletes but will not share any of the money. North Carolina was investigated for seven years and what they were doing was disgusting, but since it was North carolinia it was okay. Just remember some of these so called rules infractions and the gigantic thumb that these players are under. When you see a bunch of Jarret Culver jerseys remember he got nothing from it, but the NCAA who have already made billions off these kids got all that money too.